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Bee and Cornflower Common Daisy
 Wild Garlic   Bee and Cornflowers   Common Daisy 
Cornflower Cornflower close-up Hawksbeard
 Cornflower   Cornflower CLose Up   Hawkweed 
Dahlia Dahlia Dahlia
 Dahlia   Dahlia   Dahlia 
Dahlia Dahlia Dahlia
 Dahlia   Dahlia   Dahlia 
Delphinium Delphinium Dianthus
 Delphinium   Delphinium   Dianthus 
Globe Thistle California Poppy Meadow Fescue
 Globe Thistle   California Poppy   Meadow Fescue 
Hawksbeard Lillium Lillium
 Hawksbeard   Lily   Lily 
Allysum Apple Hawkweed
 Allysum   Apple   Hawkweed 
Poppy Papaver Somniferum Petunia
 Poppy   Poppies   Petunia 
Delphineum L. Cactus Marigold and Geranium
 Timothy Grass   Cactus   Marigold and Geranium 
Orchid
     Orchid     
 

Wild Garlic

Allium Vineale

All parts of this plant have a strong odor of garlic. Native to Europe and Northwestern Africa and parts of Southwestern Asia is considered an invasive species in North America. However in spite of it's pestiferous qualities gardeners are attracted to it's colourful display. Also known as Crow garlic or Stag's garlic it consist of an underground bulb about 1-2 cm in diameter, a long stem 30 to 120 cm tall, bearing 2-4 leaves and an inflorescence 2-5 cm in diameter. The inflorescence is comprised of a number bulbils and from none to a few flowers. The flowers are subtended by a basal tract. The leaves are hollow. More information can be obtained to start at Wikipedia.

 

Bee and Cornflower

Apis Mellifera and Centaurea Cyanus

Apis Mellifera - Western Honey Bee. This photograph may not actually specifically be an Apis Genus of this order. I am not qualified to say definitively that it is an Apis Mellifera just that it looks like one. Since there are a good many bee keeping activities in close proximity it could well be an Apis Mellifera. The plant is the common Cornflower. Not so common anymore in it's native habitat, having been reduced to a small number of colonies due to the application of pesticides. However, it is a popular plant in gardens and attracts lots of pollinating insects, consequently it self seeds and most beds continue to reproduce themselves.

More information about bees can be obtained here at Wikipedia

More information about Cornflowers can be obtained here at Wikipedia

 

Common Daisy

Bellis Perenis

Bellis Perennis is an archtype of European daisy, it is distinguished from other daisies by being called Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy, or English Daisy. The Common Daisy is naturalized in most temperate climates. It is also known as bruisewort or roundwort. The Common Daisy blooms from early spring to midsummer and in ideal conditions produces blooms almost year round. They spread by rhizomes and when heavy colonization occurs are difficult to remove. Nevertheless they are popular in garden settings and attractive hedgerow plants.

More information about the Common Daisy can be obtained from here at Wikipedia

 

Cornflower

Centaurea Cyanus

Cornflowers are an annual plant growing to 16-35 inches tall, with grey-green branched stems. The leaves are lanceolate, 1-4 cm long. The flowers are most commonly an intense blue colour, produced in flowerheads (capitula) 1.5-3 cm diameter, with a ring of a few large, spreading ray florets surrounding a central cluster of disc florets. The blue pigment is protocyanin, which in roses is red. In the past it often grew as a weed in crop fields, hence its name (fields growing grains such as wheat, barley, rye, or oats were formerly known as "corn fields" in England). It is now endangered in its native habitat by agricultural intensification, particularly over-use of herbicides, destroying its habitat; in the United Kingdom it has declined from 264 sites to just 3 sites in the last 50 years.

 

Cornflower Close-up

Centaurea Cyanus

Cornflowers are an annual plant growing to 16-35 inches tall, with grey-green branched stems. The leaves are lanceolate, 1-4 cm long. The flowers are most commonly an intense blue colour, produced in flowerheads (capitula) 1.5-3 cm diameter, with a ring of a few large, spreading ray florets surrounding a central cluster of disc florets. The blue pigment is protocyanin, which in roses is red. In the past it often grew as a weed in crop fields, hence its name (fields growing grains such as wheat, barley, rye, or oats were formerly known as "corn fields" in England). It is now endangered in its native habitat by agricultural intensification, particularly over-use of herbicides, destroying its habitat; in the United Kingdom it has declined from 264 sites to just 3 sites in the last 50 years.

 

Hawkweed

Pilosella aurantiaca

Hawkweed, Fox-and-cubs, Orange Hawkweed, Tawny Hawkweed, Devil's Paintbrush, Grim-the-collier. All parts of this plant exude a milky juice. The stem and leaves are covered with hairs. The hairs are short and stiff.

 

Dahlia

Dahlia Variabilis

Dahlia is a genus of bushy, tuberous, perennial plants native to Mexico, Central America, and Colombia. There are at least 36 species of dahlia. Dahlia hybrids are commonly grown as garden plants. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremonies, as well as decorative purposes, and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes. Dahlias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Angle Shades, Common Swift, Ghost Moth and Large Yellow Underwing. The dahlia is named after Swedish 18th-century botanist Anders Dahl. In German the dahlia was known during most of the 19th century as Georgia, being named after the naturalist Johann Gottlieb Georgi of St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

Dahlia

Dahlia Variabilis

Dahlia is a genus of bushy, tuberous, perennial plants native to Mexico, Central America, and Colombia. There are at least 36 species of dahlia. Dahlia hybrids are commonly grown as garden plants. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremonies, as well as decorative purposes, and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes. Dahlias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Angle Shades, Common Swift, Ghost Moth and Large Yellow Underwing. The dahlia is named after Swedish 18th-century botanist Anders Dahl. In German the dahlia was known during most of the 19th century as Georgia, being named after the naturalist Johann Gottlieb Georgi of St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

Dahlia

Dahlia Variabilis

Dahlia is a genus of bushy, tuberous, perennial plants native to Mexico, Central America, and Colombia. There are at least 36 species of dahlia. Dahlia hybrids are commonly grown as garden plants. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremonies, as well as decorative purposes, and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes. Dahlias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Angle Shades, Common Swift, Ghost Moth and Large Yellow Underwing. The dahlia is named after Swedish 18th-century botanist Anders Dahl. In German the dahlia was known during most of the 19th century as Georgia, being named after the naturalist Johann Gottlieb Georgi of St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

Dahlia

Dahlia Variabilis

Dahlia is a genus of bushy, tuberous, perennial plants native to Mexico, Central America, and Colombia. There are at least 36 species of dahlia. Dahlia hybrids are commonly grown as garden plants. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremonies, as well as decorative purposes, and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes. Dahlias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Angle Shades, Common Swift, Ghost Moth and Large Yellow Underwing. The dahlia is named after Swedish 18th-century botanist Anders Dahl. In German the dahlia was known during most of the 19th century as Georgia, being named after the naturalist Johann Gottlieb Georgi of St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

Dahlia

Dahlia Variabilis

Dahlia is a genus of bushy, tuberous, perennial plants native to Mexico, Central America, and Colombia. There are at least 36 species of dahlia. Dahlia hybrids are commonly grown as garden plants. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremonies, as well as decorative purposes, and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes. Dahlias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Angle Shades, Common Swift, Ghost Moth and Large Yellow Underwing. The dahlia is named after Swedish 18th-century botanist Anders Dahl. In German the dahlia was known during most of the 19th century as Georgia, being named after the naturalist Johann Gottlieb Georgi of St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

Dahlia

Dahlia Variabilis

Dahlia is a genus of bushy, tuberous, perennial plants native to Mexico, Central America, and Colombia. There are at least 36 species of dahlia. Dahlia hybrids are commonly grown as garden plants. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremonies, as well as decorative purposes, and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes. Dahlias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Angle Shades, Common Swift, Ghost Moth and Large Yellow Underwing. The dahlia is named after Swedish 18th-century botanist Anders Dahl. In German the dahlia was known during most of the 19th century as Georgia, being named after the naturalist Johann Gottlieb Georgi of St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

Delphinium

Delphinium Bakeri

A beautiful array of Delphiniums.

 

Delphinium

Delphinium Bakeri

Delphinium Bakeri set among Cornflowers and Poppies and common Daisies.

 

Dianthus

Diathus

"Dianthus"

 

Globe Thistle

Echinops

Echinops is a genus of about 120 species of flowering plants in the family Asteraceae, I don't know the particular variety of this plant, commonly known as globe thistles. They have spiny foliage and produce blue or white spherical flower heads. They are native to Europe, central Asia, and the mountains of tropical Africa. This one appears to be growing well in central British Columbia

 

California Poppy

Eschscholzia Californica

California Poppies, a species of papaveraceae native to the United States of America and Mexico. A personal favourite.

 

Meadow Fescue

Festuca Pratensis

The meadow fescue, grows in old pastures, along roadsides, and riversides. It likes rich, moist soil especially heavy loams. Tall and tufted similar to Festuca Arundicea. It grows in meadows, roadsides, old pastures, and riversides on moist, rich soils, especially on loamy and heavy soils. It is a tall, tufted grass similar to tall fescue Festuca arundinacea. Tall fescue differs by having minute hairs on the auricles. It can hybridise with Lolium perenne and Lolium multiflorum.

Synonyms are: Bromus pratensis; Bucetum pratense; Festuca fluitans L. a varient of pratensis; Festuca elatior L. a subspecies of pratensis; Lolium pratense; Tragus pratensis; Schedonorus pratensis.

It is a species of grass, which is perennial and often an ornamental grass in gardens.

An important forage crop.

 

Hawksbeard

Crepis Auraea

Crepis, commonly known in some parts of the world as hawksbeard or hawk's-beard (but not to be confused with the related genus Hieracium similarly appellated), is a genus of annual and perennial flowering plants of the family Asteraceae superficially resembling the dandelion, the most conspicuous difference being that Crepis usually has branching scapes with multiple heads (though solitary heads can occur). The genus name Crepis derives from the Greek krepis, meaning "slipper" or "sandal", possibly in reference to the shape of the fruit. The genus is distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere and Africa, and several plants are known as introduced species practically worldwide. The center of diversity is in the Mediterranean.

 

Lily

Lillium

Lillium, a name for true lilies, are the herbaceous large showy flowering bulbs. Coming in an ammazing array of colours, amid a bed of Bachelor Buttons

 

Lily

Lillium

Lillium, a name for true lilies, are the herbaceous large showy flowering bulbs. Coming in an ammazing array of colours, amid a bed of Bachelor Buttons

 

Allysum

Lobularia Maritima

Allysum, a common name for Sweet Allysum or sometimes known as Sweet Alison. Either way this pretty little flower is a common garden ornament used to fill in space between other plants or planted alone in beds. This plant is from the family Brassicaceae. Widely naturalized in temperate regions of the world it hails from the Mediterranean. Commonly white but also pink, rose red, violet and lilac. The flower is sweet smelling hence it's appellation.

 

Apple

Malus Domestica

The apple originates in central Asia, there are still wild apples (Malus Sieversii) in the specific area of origination which is Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Xinjiang, China. The apple is favoured for it's sweet pomaceous fruit and is widely eaten raw and cooked as desert. China produces half the worlds production of apples with the United States of America producing six percent coming second in terms of production. Turkey, Italy, Poland and India make significant contribution to apple production. The juice of apples is also quite popular. Apples are a member of the rose family (Rosaceae) and are also used to produce different kinds of popular alcoholic beverages with cider and apple jack probably being the most commonly known. Because of their high sugar content many species used for alcohol production actually start to ferment on the tree.

 

Hawkweed

Hieracium

Hawkweed has a number of appearances, this plant which looks like a dandelion gone to seed is not a 'Taraxacum' but more than likely a Hieracium variety. Because I did not ever see the flower I have no idea of it's actual species. It could be Scouleri which is common in British Columbia.

 

Poppy

Papaver Laciniatum

Commonly found in British Columbia gardens, often grown for the seed.

 

Poppies

Papaver somniferum L.

A meaning for the depiction and use of poppies in Greco-Roman myths is the symbolism of the bright scarlet colour as signifying the promise of resurrection after death. The poppy of wartime remembrance is Papaver rhoeas, the red flowered Corn poppy. This poppy is a common weed in Europe and is found in many locations, including Flanders Fields, the setting for the famous poem by Canadian surgeon and soldier, John McCrae, "In Flanders Fields". In the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand artificial poppies (plastic in Canada, paper in the US, UK, Australia and New Zealand) are worn to commemorate those who died in War. In the United States this is in conjunction with Veterans' Day, in Canada this is part of the Remembrance Day ceremonies, both falling on November 11th, though generally poppies are worn from the beginning of November until that day.

 

Petunia

Solanaceae Petunioideae

Petunia is genus of 35 species of flowering plants of South American origin, closely related to tobacco, cape gooseberries, tomatoes, deadly nightshades, potatoes and chili peppers; in the family Solanaceae.

 

Timothy Grass

Phleum_Pratense

Timothy grass, also known as Meadow Cat's Tail or Common Cat's Tail, is a perennial grass and a major source of fodder for British and American farmers.

 

Cactus

Sempervivum tectorum

It has grey-green, tufted, sessile leaves, 4 - 10 cm (2 - 4 in) in diameter, which are often suffused with rose-red. In summer it bears clusters of reddish-purple flowers, in multiples of 8-16, on hairy erect flat-topped stems. The species is highly variable, in part because hundreds of cultivars have been propagated, sold, and traded for nearly 200 years.

 

Marigold and Geranium

Tagetes Linnaeus and Pelargonium

Marigold and Geraniums, quite common garden plants, resistant to many diseases and insect infestations. The leaves of Pelargonium have a scented output when handled quite gently. Slugs are supposed to be repelled by Marigolds.

 

Orchid

Orchidaceae Orchis

Orchidaceae is a diverse and widespread family of flowering plants, with blooms that are often colourful and often fragrant, commonly known as the orchid family. Along with the Asteraceae, they are one of the two largest families of flowering plants. Orchidaceae has about 27,800 currently accepted species, distributed in about 880 genera. The determination of which family is larger is still under debate, because verified data on the members of such enormous families are continually in flux. Regardless, the number of orchid species nearly equals the number of bony fishes and is more than twice the number of bird species, and about four times the number of mammal species. The family also encompasses about 6–11% of all seed plants. The largest genera are Bulbophyllum (2,000 species), Epidendrum (1,500 species), Dendrobium (1,400 species) and Pleurothallis (1,000 species). The family also includes Vanilla (the genus of the vanilla plant), Orchis (type genus), and many commonly cultivated plants such as Phalaenopsis and Cattleya. Moreover, since the introduction of tropical species into cultivation in the 19th century, horticulturists have produced more than 100,000 hybrids and cultivars.